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Crane Inspections

Why do I have to have my overhead cranes and hoists inspected?

Increased Safety: Having your 'Frequent' and 'Periodic' Inspections completed on a regular basis will most definitely provide a safer and more productive environment for your employees. Hoosier Crane meets or exceeds the ASME B30, OSHA, NEC and other specified requirements for crane inspections.

It is a Requirement: OSHA 1910.179 requires both a 'Frequent' and 'Periodic' Inspection be done on your crane and hoist equipment. OSHA will also incorporate by reference the ASME, ANSI, NEC and other industry standards.

Liability: Inspections performed by a trained and qualified inspector will reduce your exposure to accidents and equipment failures. Can you afford the legal fees and insurance premiums if someone gets hurt and 1.) the inspections were never performed and/or 2.) the inspections were performed by someone who was not qualified to do the inspections correctly?

Equipment Reliability: If you are performing inspections 'Frequently' and 'Periodically' your equipment will undoubtedly break down less, which leads to increased productivity. As noted in a study of the Process Industry, "You can expect a reduction between 60%-95% of your crane and hoist safety related defects in the first year if you have your overhead cranes and hoists inspected regularly." Hoosier Crane utilizes a predictive maintenance type inspection program that will substantially increase the reliability of your equipment.

How often do I need to have my overhead crane inspected?

OSHA 1910.179 breaks the inspections into two categories. 'Frequent' & 'Periodic'

Frequent Inspections: Daily to monthly intervals. (Visual and Operational Type)

  • Hooks, Hoist Chains, Wire Ropes and all functional operating mechanisms formal adjustment need to be checked daily. This is normally performed by the operator.
  • The Hooks, Hoist Chains and Wire Ropes need to also be more thoroughly inspected and documented on a monthly basis.

Periodic Inspections: Monthly to yearly intervals.(Complete Visual & Operational Type)

  • Normal service - annually
  • Heavy service - semi-annually (Heavy service is use at 80 to 100% of rated load or in excess of 10 lift cycles per hour as a normal procedure.)
  • Severe service - quarterly (Severe service is use at normal and/or heavy use in an abnormal environment such as high or low ambient temperatures, exposure to adverse weather, corrosive fumes, dust or moisture laden atmospheres, & hazardous environments A designated and qualified person shall determine whether conditions found during the inspection constitute a hazard and whether disassembly is required for additional inspection.
What are the qualifications to inspect over head cranes and hoists?

A Crane Inspector is any person engaging in the testing, examination, and/or inspection of cranes, including, top running types, under running types, single girder or double girder types and the hoisting equipment associated with the cranes.

Experience: A crane inspector, according to CMAA, shall have at least 2,000 field hours of experience directly related to the maintenance, servicing, repairing, modifying and functional testing of cranes and the hoist equipment. CMAA also notes that under no circumstances should an individual be permitted to perform inspections who has not received appropriate training and does not have knowledge of the applicable codes and regulations of the equipment to be inspected.

Required Training: The inspector should have formal training in the areas of: safety and design codes that are related to overhead cranes; Federal, State and local codes and standards; safe operating practices of cranes and hoists; understanding of how to write a report and documentation procedures; and understand the crane and hoist terminology to better communicate.

The words "should" and "shall" are used throughout the codes and standards. The inspector shall receive training to understand the meaning of these words and be able to accurately explain if a corrective action is mandatory (shall) or is voluntary (should).

What does the standard say about load testing my overhead cranes?

Current specifications regarding the load tests of Overhead Crane Systems

ANSI B30.11 requires the following:

11-2.2.2 Rated Load Test: (a) Prior to initial use, all new, extensively repaired, and altered equipment shall be tested and inspected by, or under the direction of, an appointed or authorized person, and a written report should be furnished by such person, confirming the load rating of the system. The load rating should be no more than 80% of the maximum load sustained during the test.

OSHA 1910.179 Paragraph K2 states the following:

Rated load test: Test loads shall not be more than 125% of the rated load unless otherwise recommended by the manufacturer. The test reports shall be placed on file where readily available to appointed personnel.

Definitions

Hoist: A machinery unit that is used for lifting and lowering a load.
Crane: A bridging structure that spans two or more runways and provides traversing motion.
Runway: The rails, beams, brackets and framework on which the crane operates.

Conclusion

In Hoosier Crane's opinion, it is the owner's responsibility to load test the overhead bridge crane system. The "system" consists of the hoist, crane, runways, columns and footings. Testing the "system" requires that the full system be in place.  Therefore, testing must occur after the completion of the crane installation. Although it is a hoist industry practice to load test every hoist prior to shipping, this practice does not preclude the requirement for the full load testing upon commissioning of the full hoist, crane and runway system.

When I call for service on my hoist, what information should I have ready?

Please have these items ready:

  • Hoist model number
  • Serial number
  • Voltage

Overhead Crane and Hoist

How to Set an Overhead Crane with a Forklift

At Hoosier Crane we build and install a lot of overhead crane systems. We also sell a lot of overhead crane kits to customers who may never have built or installed a crane system before. One of our crane kit customers called us today looking for guidance in regards to installing the new overhead crane which he had just assembled from one of our crane kits. He wanted to specifically know how to set an overhead crane with a forklift. We thought that it would be a good idea to share with our other crane kit customers a few brief points on how to install a top running overhead crane with a forklift, so we put together this video of us installing a single girder overhead crane with a forklift.

Video of How to Set an Overhead Crane with a Forklift
Steps to install an overhead crane with a forklift

This job requires a trained forklift operator and at least one spotter, a scissor lift is also recommended for the spotter to safely be able to direct and position the crane onto the runway.

  1. Secure any dangling festoon wires that could become tangled or caught during installation with zip ties.
  2. Position your forklift on the beam side (opposite the festoon) of the overhead crane. Also be sure that you have the crane positioned with the collector staff towards the runway where your power bar will be.
  3. When positioning the forks they should be set as wide as possible.
  4. Begin near the center of the beam finding the center of gravity moving left or right as necessary. Slowly lift the forks once you have found the center of gravity so that the overhead crane balances evenly on the forks a few feet off the ground. Be careful that your hoist, hook or any other components of the crane are not in the way of the forks.
  5. With the overhead crane lifted a few feet off the ground with your forklift, have your spotter secure the beam to the forks with large C-clamps.
  6. With the crane secured to the forks, position the bridge crane diagonally between the runways such that the end trucks will clear the inside edges of the runway.
  7. Slowly lift the overhead crane with the forklift until the bottom of the endtrucks are above the rail of the runway system, with the spotter watching and directing to ensure clearance of runway and avoiding any other obstructions. Be aware of any overhead obstructions above the crane such as lights or sprinkler heads.
  8. Have the spotter direct the forklift driver to position the overhead crane moving it from diagonal to perpendicular to the runway system.
  9. From an elevated position the spotter should ensure the wheels of the endtrucks are parallel and are aligned with the rail of the runway.
  10. Once aligned, slowly lower the overhead crane with your forklift so that it just touches the rails of the runway.
  11. Have your spotter remove the C-clamps securing the forklift to the bridge beam and finish lowering the forks to the ground.

You are now ready to continue the installation of your overhead crane system.

Do I have to be certified to maintain or repair overhead cranes and monorails?

Yes. According to the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) standard,B30.11 you need to have your maintenance and repair personnel certified to work on overhead cranes and monorails.

Revised in 2010, the most apparent change to the B30.11 standard is the addition of Chapter 11 – 4, “Maintenance Training and Maintenance.”   B30.11-4.1 states, “Maintenance training shall be provided to promote proficient adjustments, repairs, and replacements on crane and monorail systems….”

This added chapter includes requirements for not only underhung crane and monorail maintenance training, but for certification as an underhung crane and monorail maintenance person.  Certification is required for all persons who maintain and / or service monorails and underhung cranes. 

Are you and your underhung crane and monorail maintenance personnel trained and certified?

If your answer is “no” and you are interested in becoming certified, please look at our crane school for more information on training.

Do I need an electrician to wire the overhead crane kit?

No.

The R&M and Shaw-box crane kits are a "plug and play" system. You simply have to plug the electrical connections together.

Hoosier Crane would recommend an electrician if you do not feel comfortable making the plug connections or installing the incoming power to the crane.

Can you assemble my overhead crane?

Yes.

Hoosier Crane can install and assemble your overhead crane or can ship it to you for your own installation. Whichever option you choose we are always available for questions and concerns throughout the process.

Do you offer a radio control option for my overhead crane?

Yes.

If you'd like to know more about our radio control options click here.

We typically recommend using the Enrange Flex EX2 series of radios for most applications.

How can I save money by buying an overhead crane kit?
  1. You get your overhead crane components for less than your local crane company pays.  We build a lot of motorized overhead cranes, our purchasing power means you save.
  2. Use your labor force to build a motorized overhead crane kit and you have control of your labor rates.
  3. You control installation and production schedule.
  4. Save big on freight! Buy your steel locally and save cost of shipping a fully assemble crane system across the country.
  5. Free expert support from our experienced staff to support you as you build your crane
  6. Gain valuable knowledge on how to service your crane in the future
  7. Great warranty support and top prices on options, accessories, and spare parts kits save money and improve efficiency
  8. Improved material handling saves you money by improving efficiency and output.

More About Overhead Crane Kits

How do I know if I need a top running or under running crane?

Top running cranes take up more space and require support columns for their runway and can facilitate loads up to 80 tons.

They are heavy lifters and work best with wire rope hoists.

Under running cranes are good for 2-15 ton capacities and do not need support columns because they are supported by the building.

They take up less space and work well for push cranes.

How often do I need to have my overhead crane inspected?

OSHA 1910.179 breaks the inspections into two categories. "Frequent" & "Periodic"

Frequent Inspections: Daily to monthly intervals. (Visual and Operational Type)

  • Hooks, Hoist Chains, Wire Ropes and all functional operating mechanisms formal adjustment need to be checked daily. This is normally performed by the operator.
  • The Hooks, Hoist Chains and Wire Ropes need to also be more thoroughly inspected and documented on a monthly basis.

Periodic Inspections: Monthly to yearly intervals.(Complete Visual & Operational Type)

  • Normal service - annually
  • Heavy service - semi-annually (Heavy service is use at 80 to 100% of rated load or in excess of 10 lift cycles per hour as a normal procedure.)
  • Severe service - quarterly (Severe service is use at normal and/or heavy use in an abnormal environment such as high or low ambient temperatures, exposure to adverse weather, corrosive fumes, dust or moisture laden atmospheres, & hazardous environments A designated and qualified person shall determine whether conditions found during the inspection constitute a hazard and whether disassembly is required for additional inspection.
How often should I lubricate my chain hoist?

Always refer to your operator manual for the correct lubrication schedule.

Once a week under normal conditions is about the average time frame. But remember, if your hoist needs warranty repair and the damage is caused by an unlubricated chain, your hoist warranty will be voided.

When should I test my hoist?

Any new, used, or repaired hoist that has gone 12 months without use should be tested.

Make sure you test the hoist with no load, a regular load, and maximum load.

What equipment comes in an "overhead crane kit?"

An overhead crane kit comes with all the equipment you will need besides the big yellow girder.

It includes:

  • Hoist
  • End trucks
  • Control panel
  • Festoon kit
  • Gearbox
  • Pendant
What are the qualifications to inspect overhead cranes and hoists?

A Crane Inspector is any person engaging in the testing, examination, and/or inspection of cranes, including, top running types, under running types, single girder or double girder types and the hoisting equipment associated with the cranes.

Experience: A crane inspector, according to CMAA, shall have at least 2,000 field hours of experience directly related to the maintenance, servicing, repairing, modifying and functional testing of cranes and the hoist equipment. CMAA also notes that under no circumstances should an individual be permitted to perform inspections who has not received appropriate training and does not have knowledge of the applicable codes and regulations of the equipment to be inspected.

Required Training: The inspector should have formal training in the areas of: safety and design codes that are related to overhead cranes; Federal, State and local codes and standards; safe operating practices of cranes and hoists; understanding of how to write a report and documentation procedures; and understand the crane and hoist terminology to better communicate.

The words "should" and "shall" are used throughout the codes and standards. The inspector shall receive training to understand the meaning of these words and be able to accurately explain if a corrective action is mandatory (shall) or is voluntary (should).

What is your maximum bridge span length that you can manufacture?

Hoosier Crane can create as wide a span length as needed for your overhead crane.

We have the resources to design and manufacture the perfect overhead crane for your application no matter the bridge length. Depending upon the length of the bridge and the capacity of the overhead crane, the design may require using box girders instead of traditional wide flange steel beams.  This is a function of the length and load on the bridge and the fact that there is a maximum length in which standard wide flange steel beams are available.  60 feet is typically the maximum length a wide flange or I beam is available, for length greater than that box girders can be used to spans well over 100 feet.

Why are the Free Standing Jibs that Hoosier Crane sells better than the competitors?

We have 3 reasons why our free standing jib cranes are better than the competition's.

1. Full gusset base plates

Other manufacturers typically utilize open gussets which can cause a warped effect.

Benefits of using full gussets:

  • Stronger base to support the crane
  • Less deflection at the tip of the boom

2. Large head size

Other manufacturers utilize a smaller head that can disfigure and damage the crane components leading to difficulty with the operation of the crane.

Benefits of larger head:

  • Eliminates crushing of trunnion rollers
  • Decreases deflection

3. Unique design of trunnion rollers

Prevents cutting into the mast, eliminating the need for a wear band. Other manufacturers use smaller trunnion rollers or cams that may actually carve into the pipe during rotation.

Benefits of these trunnion rollers:

  • Ease of rotation
  • No need for a wear band

Two types of trunnion roller assemblies are used:

  • Type 1 - single formed channel and two rollers for mast diameters of 16" or less
  • Type 2 - four rollers used for mast diameters of 18" or more
What are the key components of a fall protection system?

Nearly all fall protection equipment is made of 4 key parts.

  1. The anchorage and anchorage connector - The anchorage is usually referred to as the tie-off point. An example of an anchorage would be an I-beam or an engineered fall protection system like a Gorbel Tether Track System.
  2. The anchorage connector - The anchorage connector is used to pair the connecting device to the anchorage.
  3. The connecting device - The connecting device is the link that joins the body wear to the anchorage connector. Examples are a retractable lifeline or a shock-absorbing lanyard (shown above).
  4. The body wear - The body wear is the protective equipment worn by the worker also known as a fall protection harness.

For more information contact our sales staff at 800-509-6131 or visit http://www.hoosiercrane.com/fall-protection

What voltage options are available with your cranes?

We have offer all standard voltage options for our overhead cranes and crane kits.

We offer cranes in both Three (3) Phase and single phase configurations voltages. The most popular and efficient voltage option for overhead cranes and hoists in the United States is 460 Volt 3 Phase. Most of our in stock fast ship crane kits are configured for this voltage. Some less common and international voltage options may lead to longer lead times, but are available.

Our cranes are available in:

  • 208 Volt 3 Phase
  • 230 Volt 3 Phase
  • 460 Volt 3 Phase
  • 480 Volt 3 Phase
  • 575 Volt 3 Phase
  • 110/120 Volt Single Phase
  • 220/230 Volt Single Phase
What are the requirements for hot metal hoists?

Hot Metal Handling hoists are held to different specifications than any standard duty hoist. If your crane is carrying hot or molten metal, it may be subject to additional safety standards per OSHA and ASTM.

What should I do or not do while operating a hoist?

Hoist Operation Do's and Don'ts: A Brief Guide to operational safety to be done before operating a electric chain hoist, wire rope hoist or manual hoist.

What are the hoist warranty policies?

Below are some links to the manufacturer's warranty policies.

Yale, R&M Materials Handling, Harrington, and Columbus McKinnon all have their own hoist warranties. To view them click the PDFs linked below.

If You Need a Quote on one of these Products please Request a Quote

What OSHA standard applies to Lifelines and Lanyards?

Lifelines and Lanyards for fall protection are covered by OSHA standard number 1926.104.

Part Number:    1926
Part Title:    Safety and Health Regulations for Construction
Subpart:    E
Subpart Title:    Personal Protective and Life Saving Equipment
Standard Number:    1926.104
Title:    Safety belts, lifelines, and lanyards.

1926.104(a)

Lifelines, safety belts, and lanyards shall be used only for employee safeguarding. Any lifeline, safety belt, or lanyard actually subjected to in-service loading, as distinguished from static load testing, shall be immediately removed from service and shall not be used again for employee safeguarding.

1926.104(b)

Lifelines shall be secured above the point of operation to an anchorage or structural member capable of supporting a minimum dead weight of 5,400 pounds.

1926.104(c)

Lifelines used on rock-scaling operations, or in areas where the lifeline may be subjected to cutting or abrasion, shall be a minimum of 7/8-inch wire core manila rope. For all other lifeline applications, a minimum of 3/4-inch manila or equivalent, with a minimum breaking strength of 5,400 pounds, shall be used.

1926.104(d)

Safety belt lanyard shall be a minimum of 1/2-inch nylon, or equivalent, with a maximum length to provide for a fall of no greater than 6 feet. The rope shall have a nominal breaking strength of 5,400 pounds.

..1926.104(e)

1926.104(e)

All safety belt and lanyard hardware shall be drop forged or pressed steel, cadmium plated in accordance with type 1, Class B plating specified in Federal Specification QQ-P-416. Surface shall be smooth and free of sharp edges.

1926.104(f)

All safety belt and lanyard hardware, except rivets, shall be capable of withstanding a tensile loading of 4,000 pounds without cracking, breaking, or taking a permanent deformation.

 

[59 FR 40729, Aug. 9, 1994; 60 FR 5131, Jan. 26, 1995; 60 FR 39254, Aug. 2, 1995]

What considerations should I make before selecting a jib crane?

There are many factors to consider before selecting a jib crane.

  • Know what type and the extent of structural supports you have available.
  • Any current or future need for powered operation of the hoist or crane.
  • The characteristic and design of each crane type.
  • The overall height and height under boom offered.
  • The relative cost of each jib crane type.
  • The overall cost of installation.
When is the best time to schedule a service call for my equipment?

To minimize interference with your production and to be able to anticipate a service call, the best option is to schedule a monthly service date.

This way you have a concrete date on which we can inspect your equipment every month and you can plan accordingly.

What if I have a special request for a crane kit and can't fully explain it on the Request For Quote page?

Contact us.

We know that there are a lot of variations when selecting a crane so feel free to give us a call or send us an email to talk to one of our crane kit specialist.

You can now also upload a PDF or JPG with your RFQ to clarify or define your overhead crane specifications.

Our toll free number is (800) 509-6131.

Load Testing

What is OSHA's enforcement policy regarding rated load testing for new and altered cranes?

 As discussed in the reply to question 1, OSHA requires rated load testing for new and altered cranes prior to their initial use to ensure that any significant problems or errors made during the repair or installation process would be revealed prior to placing the crane in operation. OSHA does not consider the provisions regarding rated load testing in the most recent version of ANSI B30.2, ANSI B30.2-2005, to be as protective as the requirements in 29 CFR 1910.179(k). Therefore, an employer must comply with the OSHA standard and cannot utilize the ANSI standard as a basis for a de minimus condition.

Does OSHA require rated load tests for new or altered cranes?

OSHA requires rated load tests for new and altered cranes as stated in OSHA's letter of interpretation to Mr. Thomas Hagerty dated March 4, 1991. OSHA's standard at 29 CFR 1910.179(b) states:

(2) New and existing equipment. All new overhead and gantry cranes constructed and installed on or after August 31, 1971, shall meet the design specifications of the American National Standard Safety Code for Overhead and Gantry Cranes, ANSI B30.2.0-1967, which is incorporated by reference as specified in Sec. 1910.6.

(3) Modifications. Cranes may be modified and re-rated provided such modifications and the supporting structure are checked thoroughly for the new rated load by a qualified engineer or the equipment manufacturer. The crane shall be tested in accordance with paragraph (k)(2) of this section. New rated load shall be displayed in accordance with subparagraph (5) of this paragraph.

Additionally, OSHA's standard at 29 CFR 1910.179(k) states:

  1. Operational tests.
    1. Prior to initial use all new and altered cranes shall be tested to insure compliance with this section including the following functions:
      1. Hoisting and lowering.
      2. Trolley travel.
      3. Bridge travel.
      4. Limit switches, locking and safety devices.
    2. The trip setting of hoist limit switches shall be determined by tests with an empty hook traveling in increasing speeds up to the maximum speed. The actuating mechanism of the limit switch shall be located so that it will trip the switch, under all conditions, in sufficient time to prevent contact of the hook or hook block with any part of the trolley.
  2. Rated load test. Test loads shall not be more than 125 percent of the rated load unless otherwise recommended by the manufacturer. The test reports shall be placed on file where readily available to appointed personnel.

The 1984 revocation of the advisory language in 29 CFR 1910.179(k)(2) did not eliminate the requirement for new and altered cranes to be load tested. Paragraph 1910.179(k)(1) requires that "[p]rior to initial use all new and altered cranes shall be tested to insure compliance with this section [1910.179]..." As rated load testing is part of section 1910.179, employers are required to perform the test on new and altered cranes in order to be compliant with the requirement in 29 CFR 1910.179(k)(1). Also, section 1910.179 contains other provisions that necessitate load testing to ensure compliance. For instance, paragraph 1910.179(n)(1) requires the employer to ensure that "[t]he crane shall not be loaded beyond its rated load except for test purposes as provided in paragraph (k) of this section [1910.179]." In order to ensure compliance with this provision as well, an employer must confirm the load rating of the crane which would require a load test.

Once a rated load test is performed, paragraph 1910.179(k)(2) requires that "the test reports shall be placed on file where readily available to appointed personnel."